/Types Of Marble Floors
Types of Marble Floors

Types Of Marble Floors

Add a new level of class to your place by installing sophisticated and luxurious marble flooring. Marble floors come in different types in nearly every colour you can imagine. Whether you are looking for marbles with hues in black, green, white, red, pink, and even brown, you’ll surely find the right marble that can amplify the aesthetics of your abode. Below is a list of some of the types of marbles to help you find the one that meets your style and preferences.

 

Calacatta Marble

This type of marble is bright white in colour and features thick, dark veining patterns. It is considered the most luxurious and expensive of all the marble types and sits at the top of the marble hierarchy because of its rarity. Calacatta marbles are usually found in the form of slabs, tiles, and pavers. This marble can create a chicly decorated space and exudes opulence.

 

Carrara Marble

The most common, lightest, and least expensive type of marble, Carrara comes in white background with linear fine feathery veining pattern. You can typically see this classic marble being used in Roman and Greek statues and even in fountains. Its whitish appearance can turn a living space into a lively place.

 

Types of Marble Floors
Types of Marble Floors

 

Emperador Marble

Quarried from Spain, Emperador Marble varies from the greys and whites associated with Carrara and Calacatta. It comes in various shades of brown colour and features exhibits irregular veins, making it an ideal option for rooms with brass or gold accessories or furniture. The darker colours are perfect for a high-traffic floor or a fireplace.

 

CremaMarfil

This one is also from a Spanish region, specifically near Alicante. Although it is not technically a type of marble, it mimics the appearance of a marble. It comes in numerous tonal variations and has veins that vary in irregularity and intensity. It can be an ideal choice if you will be using other colour or darker tones in your flooring, decorations, and exterior cladding.

 

Nero Marquina

Another marble from Spain, Nero Marquina comes in black colour with white veining patterns making it stunning. It can be an ideal option for homeowners or property owners who are planning to follow a contemporary design. It looks amazing not only in floorings but even in bathrooms, or as backsplashes.

 

Levadia Black

Also known as Titanium black, Levadia black marble is quarried in Greece and is typically used to decorate countertops. It apparently comes in black colour with fine, smoke spot veining pattern.

 

Volakas

Also, a Greek Marble, Volakas is a magnificent white marble with blue and very light grey striations. It is usually used indoors such as in bathrooms.

 

 

 

Crema Beige

Crema Beige originates from Turkey. It shows consistent colour and does not have many variations, making it look almost flat.

 

Breccia Marble

It features swirl patterns and striking grain. It comes in warm shades of gold, red and tan.

Marble flooring Tiles come in various other types. The marble listed above are just some of the tens or hundreds of other types available in the market. However, the abundance of option makes spotting the differences and choosing which one is the best can be a bit challenging and difficult especially to the untrained eye. Hence, if you are planning to install marble flooring, it would be ideal to do an in-depth research so you’ll be able to find the perfect fit. Or you could just choose to ask for help from an expert.

Apart from knowing the different types of marble, it also helps if you’ll learn the various types of finishes such as honed and polished, as well as the sizes. Also, consider doing research regarding the prizes. Learning such factors could also help you decide whether to install the floorings with the help of skilled installers or just go for DIY projects.

 

Sources:

https://www.diynetwork.com/how-to/rooms-and-spaces/floors/what-you-should-know-about-marble-flooring

 

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